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starbucks coffee will be successfull in Ghana ?

Poll ended at Thu May 04, 2006 6:42 pm

Yes
4
67%
No
2
33%
 
Total votes : 6

Starbucks

Postby MSH » Mon Apr 03, 2006 6:42 pm

A group of investors are thinking of introducing starbucks to Ghana. I think Ghana today is in a good stage to introduce such a business. When we look at the Nandos restaurant chains growing these days in Accra, I don't believe Ghanaians will shun away from such a place. Especially people who work in the white color jobs in Ghana. What do you guys think ?
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Postby Mr. E » Mon Apr 03, 2006 10:06 pm

Ghanaians don't like coffee that much. We prefer tea (which is actually chocolate drink). That being said it would be nice to have such a big franchise investing in Ghana. I can't say much about the business feasibility of such a venture but if for nothing else Ghanaians would just love the opportunity to tell people "there's a Starbucks in my country."

On the other hand Accra is cosmopolitan enough that there are enough open-minded people available to patronize a place like Starbucks with all its Western trappings.
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Re: Starbucks

Postby Luu » Tue Apr 04, 2006 6:38 pm

Anaconda wrote:A group of investors are thinking of introducing starbucks to Ghana. I think Ghana today is in a good stage to introduce such a business. When we look at the Nandos restaurant chains growing these days in Accra, I don't believe Ghanaians will shun away from such a place. Especially people who work in the white color jobs in Ghana. What do you guys think ?



I think Starbucks will be successful in Ghana because caffeine is addictive and once you try 1 Starbucks coffee, you'll keep going back for more. I think the question is whether they can afford it or not but as far as them liking it, I don't think that will be a problem.
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Postby Guest » Thu Apr 13, 2006 8:52 am

Mr. E wrote:On the other hand Accra is cosmopolitan enough that there are enough open-minded people available to patronize a place like Starbucks with all its Western trappings.


And I humbly ask - what is the link between being open-minded and being able to patronize a WEstern coffee chain?
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Postby Mr. E » Thu Apr 13, 2006 7:26 pm

Anonymous wrote:
Mr. E wrote:On the other hand Accra is cosmopolitan enough that there are enough open-minded people available to patronize a place like Starbucks with all its Western trappings.


And I humbly ask - what is the link between being open-minded and being able to patronize a WEstern coffee chain?


Good question.
Since most Ghanaians do not guzzle gallons of coffee every morning as is the case elsewhere in the world, it would require open-mindedness to effect the switch from our regular bread-and-milo/koko breakfasts to a doughnut-and-coffee one
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Postby Guest » Sat Apr 15, 2006 11:17 pm

Mr. E wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Mr. E wrote:On the other hand Accra is cosmopolitan enough that there are enough open-minded people available to patronize a place like Starbucks with all its Western trappings.


And I humbly ask - what is the link between being open-minded and being able to patronize a WEstern coffee chain?


Good question.
Since most Ghanaians do not guzzle gallons of coffee every morning as is the case elsewhere in the world, it would require open-mindedness to effect the switch from our regular bread-and-milo/koko breakfasts to a doughnut-and-coffee one


I still resent the use of the word 'open-mindedness' in this context. There is absolutely nothing wrong with bread and milo in the morning. You do not develop bread and milo dependency, like people in the west have developed cafffeine dependency, and cannot function without their morning coffee. Doughnuts are also unhealthy because of all the sugar and oil they contain. Saying 'open-mindedness' is needed to switch to coffee is saying that our current breakfast choice is comparativley primitive. I doubt that is what you're trying to say, but if it is, then more power to you- you're the kind of Ghanaian we need less of.
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Postby Tit 4 Tat » Fri Apr 21, 2006 12:15 am

Maybe
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Postby Mr. E » Mon Apr 24, 2006 6:35 pm

Anonymous wrote:
Mr. E wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Mr. E wrote:On the other hand Accra is cosmopolitan enough that there are enough open-minded people available to patronize a place like Starbucks with all its Western trappings.


And I humbly ask - what is the link between being open-minded and being able to patronize a WEstern coffee chain?


Good question.
Since most Ghanaians do not guzzle gallons of coffee every morning as is the case elsewhere in the world, it would require open-mindedness to effect the switch from our regular bread-and-milo/koko breakfasts to a doughnut-and-coffee one


I still resent the use of the word 'open-mindedness' in this context. There is absolutely nothing wrong with bread and milo in the morning. You do not develop bread and milo dependency, like people in the west have developed cafffeine dependency, and cannot function without their morning coffee. Doughnuts are also unhealthy because of all the sugar and oil they contain. Saying 'open-mindedness' is needed to switch to coffee is saying that our current breakfast choice is comparativley primitive. I doubt that is what you're trying to say, but if it is, then more power to you- you're the kind of Ghanaian we need less of.


Boss, I understand what you mean. My semantics were a bit off but my argument isn't. As a Ghanaian who grew up eating this every morning I never implied that bread and milo were in any way inferior to coffee and doughnuts. How?

I meant open-mindedness in the sense of having the liberality to try coffee and doughnuts in a bread-and-milo dominated breakfast scene.
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