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Postby Kwame Nyame 64 » Thu Oct 06, 2011 7:47 pm

Q' lypse wrote:
maradona wrote:nowadays it seems like the only way to trick Ghanaian is to say you believe in jesus with your whole heart.


u guys need to grow some titanium balls and stand on ur fockin ground just as them niggas is standin on their ground campaigning their religious beliefs.

I don't give any mofo the pleasure. Not in this time and age! Hell nah! I will chew u apart psychologically and philosophically if you come at me with your rigid religious beliefs. This is why my family keep their distance when it comes to such things. Q' lypse don't take any prisoners! I've suffered enough on the hands of closed minded religious fanatics and fundamentalists!




"Very often, we are confronted by people who want us to pray their way or colleagues who want us to think their way. We must remember to maintain our individual relationship with God. We have the shining light of Soul, and because we have it, we also have the wisdom of God."

—Harold Klemp
The Language of Soul


l understand where you are going from Q.l think l understand.
We have to stand our ground and not be like door mat.l rather be an eagle than a dove anyday :)
Whether out here on the physical or in the inner worlds,l'll always defend myself when attacked.
A defence could be as simple as blessing a situation.This way,nothing returns to hurt you.Curse a situation and it returns to harm you.
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Postby maradona » Fri Oct 07, 2011 3:24 am

O-prime wrote:
Q' lypse wrote:
maradona wrote:nowadays it seems like the only way to trick Ghanaian is to say you believe in jesus with your whole heart.


u guys need to grow some titanium balls and stand on ur fockin ground just as them niggas is standin on their ground campaigning their religious beliefs.

I don't give any mofo the pleasure. Not in this time and age! Hell nah! I will chew u apart psychologically and philosophically if you come at me with your rigid religious beliefs. This is why my family keep their distance when it comes to such things. Q' lypse don't take any prisoners! I've suffered enough on the hands of closed minded religious fanatics and fundamentalists!


:lol: I hear you Q, but it aint that simple. How be, btw? Anyway, you have to understand that telling them something like this is really a big deal..Your basically saying: Hey, i'm going to burn in hell forever and theres nothing you can say to change my mind :lol: . If I wanted to shorten my mothers life, I would tell her how I really feel....ya dig?


you mind them, darwin kraa when he propose his theory of evolution he didnt tell his wife.
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Postby Q' lypse » Fri Oct 07, 2011 9:42 pm

Anonymous wrote:
Q' lypse wrote:And Maradona, you made some good points there. There are intelligent people in Ghana but the educational level sucks, period! I don't know about the varsity level.

I left Ghana in SS2. Chalay, the first blow to hit me was the level of the English language we did in Ghana compared to South Africas'.:shock: What!? Film study, Poems-alliteration, rhyme schemes (a, a, b, a, c, a-how a poem rhymes), is this the lack of resources 'guest' is talking about in Ghana:lol:. Our people never heard of this sh*t! My love for the english language and resilience made me stick to 1st language English and did it higher grade. That is, in SA there was 1st language english, 2nd and 3rd. But even on the 1st language, subjects were divided into levels of difficulty, higher, standard and lower grades. I never went down. I stuck with English higher grade but in Maths and a few subjects, I was doing standard grade. In my secondary sch Amass, I was a biology student, I was average when I wasn't pulling my socks but a genius when I took it by the horn, I exhaled in Maths, General Science and in English, I was one of the best in the whole SS2. There was a study program that was introduced in Amass, all the students on every 2nd friday wrote a test, on science, maths and english (these were general subjects). In English I used to be in the top 10 sometimes in the whole form 2 of about 200 students. I wasn't far of in general science and Maths.

Our teachers sucked! When I came SA, kai, it was harder but the teaching made it so simple! The level of education sucks, yes it lacks resources but the level......oh oh


there's an exception to every rule. honor roll here in the states, are dominated by foreign names. America's education system isn't superior to those of poor countries. They may have resources here in the states but doesn't mean their education system is necessarily better.


You confuse resilience and discipline with the standard of education in US. Africans thrive in Europe and the States because we wanna aim higher. We've come from poor and hard knock lives, we hoping to make things better back home by giving all our best. This is like a woman working twice as hard in a working environment dominated by men to get a higher position. Africans from such bad backgrounds find it tough so they study their as.ses off, becoming the best. This happened to one of my uncles in Pretoria University in the early 90s. His 1st test at varsity he got like 10%. The whites were like ah, we said it, these niggas just don't have it. Then he sat down, became serious, he was the best, getting a double scholarship. The 1st black graduate from Pretoria University (masters) SA.

You are being stubborn. I've already told you whats up, using English as an example but you are still going at it. Its nice to feel compassionate about your nation but our Ghanaian curriculum simply sucks. The contents of the subjects are weak. The resources come later and the resources you seem to be talking about is the curriculum. This means the whole education system needs to be changed.
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Postby O-prime » Fri Oct 07, 2011 9:56 pm

maradona wrote:
O-prime wrote:
Q' lypse wrote:
maradona wrote:nowadays it seems like the only way to trick Ghanaian is to say you believe in jesus with your whole heart.


u guys need to grow some titanium balls and stand on ur fockin ground just as them niggas is standin on their ground campaigning their religious beliefs.

I don't give any mofo the pleasure. Not in this time and age! Hell nah! I will chew u apart psychologically and philosophically if you come at me with your rigid religious beliefs. This is why my family keep their distance when it comes to such things. Q' lypse don't take any prisoners! I've suffered enough on the hands of closed minded religious fanatics and fundamentalists!


:lol: I hear you Q, but it aint that simple. How be, btw? Anyway, you have to understand that telling them something like this is really a big deal..Your basically saying: Hey, i'm going to burn in hell forever and theres nothing you can say to change my mind :lol: . If I wanted to shorten my mothers life, I would tell her how I really feel....ya dig?


you mind them, darwin kraa when he propose his theory of evolution he didnt tell his wife.


:lol: :lol: riiiiight riiiiight....
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Postby O-prime » Fri Oct 07, 2011 10:06 pm

Q' lypse wrote:
Anonymous wrote:
Q' lypse wrote:And Maradona, you made some good points there. There are intelligent people in Ghana but the educational level sucks, period! I don't know about the varsity level.

I left Ghana in SS2. Chalay, the first blow to hit me was the level of the English language we did in Ghana compared to South Africas'.:shock: What!? Film study, Poems-alliteration, rhyme schemes (a, a, b, a, c, a-how a poem rhymes), is this the lack of resources 'guest' is talking about in Ghana:lol:. Our people never heard of this sh*t! My love for the english language and resilience made me stick to 1st language English and did it higher grade. That is, in SA there was 1st language english, 2nd and 3rd. But even on the 1st language, subjects were divided into levels of difficulty, higher, standard and lower grades. I never went down. I stuck with English higher grade but in Maths and a few subjects, I was doing standard grade. In my secondary sch Amass, I was a biology student, I was average when I wasn't pulling my socks but a genius when I took it by the horn, I exhaled in Maths, General Science and in English, I was one of the best in the whole SS2. There was a study program that was introduced in Amass, all the students on every 2nd friday wrote a test, on science, maths and english (these were general subjects). In English I used to be in the top 10 sometimes in the whole form 2 of about 200 students. I wasn't far of in general science and Maths.

Our teachers sucked! When I came SA, kai, it was harder but the teaching made it so simple! The level of education sucks, yes it lacks resources but the level......oh oh


there's an exception to every rule. honor roll here in the states, are dominated by foreign names. America's education system isn't superior to those of poor countries. They may have resources here in the states but doesn't mean their education system is necessarily better.


You confuse resilience and discipline with the standard of education in US. Africans thrive in Europe and the States because we wanna aim higher. We've come from poor and hard knock lives, we hoping to make things better back home by giving all our best. This is like a woman working twice as hard in a working environment dominated by men to get a higher position. Africans from such bad backgrounds find it tough so they study their as.ses off, becoming the best. This happened to one of my uncles in Pretoria University in the early 90s. His 1st test at varsity he got like 10%. The whites were like ah, we said it, these niggas just don't have it. Then he sat down, became serious, he was the best, getting a double scholarship. The 1st black graduate from Pretoria University (masters) SA.

You are being stubborn. I've already told you whats up, using English as an example but you are still going at it. Its nice to feel compassionate about your nation but our Ghanaian curriculum simply sucks. The contents of the subjects are weak. The resources come later and the resources you seem to be talking about is the curriculum. This means the whole education system needs to be changed.


To be fair, I think we can all concede the English levels but my experience of folks that have come to the U.S in primary/elementary level is that they have either met or most often exceeded their U.S counterparts in Math at least. I have seen kids exceed in various subjects and fair below par in English...which led school admins to put these kids back 1 or 2 grade levels. It was only in situations where the parents FOUGHT that decision that the kids either kept pace or moved up a grade level, seeking additional tutelage for English only. I was a substitute teacher for a while so I've seen a system that seems predisposed to put kids that come from the Continent and Latin America back a grade or two...things may be different in SA.
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Postby Guest » Sun Oct 09, 2011 4:06 am

Q' lypse wrote:You confuse resilience and discipline with the standard of education in US. Africans thrive in Europe and the States because we wanna aim higher. We've come from poor and hard knock lives, we hoping to make things better back home by giving all our best. This is like a woman working twice as hard in a working environment dominated by men to get a higher position. Africans from such bad backgrounds find it tough so they study their as.ses off, becoming the best. This happened to one of my uncles in Pretoria University in the early 90s. His 1st test at varsity he got like 10%. The whites were like ah, we said it, these niggas just don't have it. Then he sat down, became serious, he was the best, getting a double scholarship. The 1st black graduate from Pretoria University (masters) SA.

You are being stubborn. I've already told you whats up, using English as an example but you are still going at it. Its nice to feel compassionate about your nation but our Ghanaian curriculum simply sucks. The contents of the subjects are weak. The resources come later and the resources you seem to be talking about is the curriculum. This means the whole education system needs to be changed.


C'mon wofa, Q. Resource's =/= curriculum. In Ghana you might be familiar with an entire class having to share a limited amount of books (not enough for everybody). But here in the states they even give each student a graphing calculator ($100+) free to take back and forth from home to school in high school. That's what I mean when I say resources. How many people can easily get access to a computer and internet in Ghana? Here in the states, computers are free and wi-fi internet is available at many places. "I don't have a computer or internet access" is not an acceptable excuse here. Can we say the same about Ghana? You have probably heard or even experienced stories of crazily brilliant young men and women in Ghana who have to resort to doing things which don't make full use of their brain powers because there's a lack of money at home to take them to school. Here in the states, you can get a scholarship because you're black. That's what I mean by resources. Get me?

Your uncle's story is inspiring. But it's also about learning from your failures in life hence you mentioned "he got serious" which to me sounds like he played around in the beginning. And South Africa is still the African continent, abi? Leave the African continent and come into the states.
Today some international buddies of mine and I were eating and they were comparing school systems back home to the states and how they find the states so easy. Because here in the states, there are things like grading curves, the guy who gets a 92 and the guy who gets a 98 both get an A so there's no difference. Whereas it's not like that back home. In many places, after high school you go straight to med school, engineering, or whatever so that means if you screw up on the entrance exam you're done. Here in the states, you can fail high school, get a GED, to a community college, build yourself up transfer to a 4 year college and still get into med school. Isn't there like one exam for the whole entire school year in? So basically screw up on that one exam and you're done then, right? Here in the states they drop your lowest grade. But maybe I'm just a kid and I don't know anything and I'm being stubborn like you're saying. Go ask Obielord about some of the international students who come to his med school (mind you Obie attends an Ivy league school)

Like I said, resources and opportunity are here in the states. On the internet alone, I can learn so much. In Ghana, how many kids can afford to stay on the internet the whole day and learn? Kids were coming to school with rice sacks as bags.

This English that you're talking about, there are American's who are worse than John Mensah. When I got to the states at just 8 years old, I lived in a "ghetto" section for a bit. My classmates used to say things like "I aint do nothing". I was speaking with a STRONG Ghanaian accent but my English was spot on. There were about 3 times where my teacher a Greek woman
made a comparison between me and my classmates. I used to get teased for my accent but she said I speak better English than them.
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Postby Guest » Sun Oct 09, 2011 4:12 am

Q' lypse wrote: Africans thrive in Europe and the States because we wanna aim higher. We've come from poor and hard knock lives, we hoping to make things better back home by giving all our best. This is like a woman working twice as hard in a working environment dominated by men to get a higher position. Africans from such bad backgrounds find it tough so they study their as.ses off, becoming the best.


You're right to some point but like I said somewhere on this thread there is always an exception, uncre.

Consider the Ghanaian girl who made waves here in the states because she was involved in porno. Does she come from a wealthy, easy background back home in Ghana? I know people personally my age and younger who were brought from Ghana as youngsters. Not even born here in the states. Brought from Ghana (so they experienced and saw hardship) these guys are school drop outs here today roaming around.

African's "thriving because they want to aim higher" is nothing to be ashamed of. The Americans themselves say, "reach for the stars the sky is the limit". That's good. It's like when people say "every Ghanaian wants to be a doctor" as if that's a bad thing :lol:

Ultimately, like I was trying to point out to maradona, education goes beyond just the classroom. Education will make things better and open ways so someone coming from a tough background should use their hardship as motivation but in the end, you're only bettering yourself with your education. You don't go to school for mom or dad. You do it for yourself
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Postby Q' lypse » Mon Oct 10, 2011 8:58 pm

Anonymous wrote:C'mon wofa, Q. Resource's =/= curriculum. In Ghana you might be familiar with an entire class having to share a limited amount of books (not enough for everybody). But here in the states they even give each student a graphing calculator ($100+) free to take back and forth from home to school in high school. That's what I mean when I say resources. How many people can easily get access to a computer and internet in Ghana? Here in the states, computers are free and wi-fi internet is available at many places. "I don't have a computer or internet access" is not an acceptable excuse here. Can we say the same about Ghana? You have probably heard or even experienced stories of crazily brilliant young men and women in Ghana who have to resort to doing things which don't make full use of their brain powers because there's a lack of money at home to take them to school. Here in the states, you can get a scholarship because you're black. That's what I mean by resources. Get me?


so you think the contents of Ghana's curriculum is up to par? Hm. I think we are both looking at two different things, you are talking United States, Im talking SA..

Anonymous wrote:This English that you're talking about, there are American's who are worse than John Mensah.


oh massa, thats a low blow, haaba

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Postby maradona » Tue Oct 11, 2011 3:53 am

Q' lypse wrote:
Anonymous wrote:C'mon wofa, Q. Resource's =/= curriculum. In Ghana you might be familiar with an entire class having to share a limited amount of books (not enough for everybody). But here in the states they even give each student a graphing calculator ($100+) free to take back and forth from home to school in high school. That's what I mean when I say resources. How many people can easily get access to a computer and internet in Ghana? Here in the states, computers are free and wi-fi internet is available at many places. "I don't have a computer or internet access" is not an acceptable excuse here. Can we say the same about Ghana? You have probably heard or even experienced stories of crazily brilliant young men and women in Ghana who have to resort to doing things which don't make full use of their brain powers because there's a lack of money at home to take them to school. Here in the states, you can get a scholarship because you're black. That's what I mean by resources. Get me?


so you think the contents of Ghana's curriculum is up to par? Hm. I think we are both looking at two different things, you are talking United States, Im talking SA..

Anonymous wrote:This English that you're talking about, there are American's who are worse than John Mensah.


oh massa, thats a low blow, haaba




this guest guy complains when i take shots at religious group now here he is making fun of american kids and john mensah. is knowing english a requirement for a person to be educated.?( you dont even have to answer this one, base on what you wrote it looks like you think so)

also do you think schools in the ghetto represent all american schools.? schools in the ghetto are not even a fraction of american schools. from what i have learn, the schools in america ghetto doesn't even receive much support from the government, i have seen kids move from the ghetto to a better community and school and then started to make progress academically.

also do you think that foreign kids dominates schools in the ghetto makes it true for the whole america. massa it is not true that foreign kids dominate american kids. first of all theres way too many american kids for foreign kids to dominate them in the honor role department.

*also i hope you know that not all american schools use that broken english daily.
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Postby Q' lypse » Tue Oct 11, 2011 8:24 am

:lol: :lol: :lol:
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Postby Janet » Sat Oct 22, 2011 4:19 am

maradona wrote:
Q' lypse wrote:
Anonymous wrote:C'mon wofa, Q. Resource's =/= curriculum. In Ghana you might be familiar with an entire class having to share a limited amount of books (not enough for everybody). But here in the states they even give each student a graphing calculator ($100+) free to take back and forth from home to school in high school. That's what I mean when I say resources. How many people can easily get access to a computer and internet in Ghana? Here in the states, computers are free and wi-fi internet is available at many places. "I don't have a computer or internet access" is not an acceptable excuse here. Can we say the same about Ghana? You have probably heard or even experienced stories of crazily brilliant young men and women in Ghana who have to resort to doing things which don't make full use of their brain powers because there's a lack of money at home to take them to school. Here in the states, you can get a scholarship because you're black. That's what I mean by resources. Get me?


so you think the contents of Ghana's curriculum is up to par? Hm. I think we are both looking at two different things, you are talking United States, Im talking SA..

Anonymous wrote:This English that you're talking about, there are American's who are worse than John Mensah.


oh massa, thats a low blow, haaba




this guest guy complains when i take shots at religious group now here he is making fun of american kids and john mensah. is knowing english a requirement for a person to be educated.?( you dont even have to answer this one, base on what you wrote it looks like you think so)

also do you think schools in the ghetto represent all american schools.? schools in the ghetto are not even a fraction of american schools. from what i have learn, the schools in america ghetto doesn't even receive much support from the government, i have seen kids move from the ghetto to a better community and school and then started to make progress academically.

also do you think that foreign kids dominates schools in the ghetto makes it true for the whole america. massa it is not true that foreign kids dominate american kids. first of all theres way too many american kids for foreign kids to dominate them in the honor role department.

*also i hope you know that not all american schools use that broken english daily.


You would be surprised at the support that poor schools receive. They get lots of it. I am in these schools on a daily basis. There are lots of problems. They have textbooks, but they cannot let the children take them home becauese they will not bring them back or they will write profanity all over them and then the book has to be discarded. I have seen a high school student leave the school campus and throw his bookbag in the woods. These students are getting into fights, even though their school is staffed with armed police officers who wear bullet-proof vests. Many of the female students are pregnant and many of the male students are wearing ankle monitors. Many of the teachers do not care about their job. Many of them cannot speak or write proper English. This is just a glimpse of what I am talking about. I could go on and on about this. Those poor West African students who come into such schools are treated terribly by their peers. They laugh at their clothing and hair. It is awful. The teachers who are West African and work in these schools are miserable as well. They tell the students that they are from West Africa and that this is where their ancestors came from, and the students deny it.
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