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Why Ghana Will Remain Poor

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Why Ghana Will Remain Poor

Postby Odartey » Tue Jul 29, 2003 4:01 am

The solution to Ghana's and indeed most of Black Africa's economic problems is multifaceted. It will take me hours and days to explain the solutions. Indeed many would find it difficult to even understand the technicalities. However there is one thing that is clear and that is, Ghanaians are lazy and always want a quick way out. This rot runs horizontally and vertically through the system.

Workers go to work and just after signing in, live the office to walk the streets or, if they stay, sleep and complain of low wages. The office is like a club-house for most workers. They forget that the employer expects some output from them. For many government establishments, there is excess employment which results in very low productivity. Ghana Airways is an example. I am not sure human resource experts in Ghana have any idea about optimum worker output when employment decisions are being taken. If management of the Airline does not take a bold decision by laying-off excess labor the company will grind to a halt to the detriment of all the workers and the country.

Africans, unlike any other human beings, are too selfish and myopic. For any society to progress, it is necessary to consider the effect of one’s actions on the general populace or on future generation. Ghanaians are the most myopic humans in the world. It looks like nobody considers the result of his or her actions on the future. A chunk of resources allocated for projects to benefit society are diverted into personal projects. Contractors are compelled to pay hefty bribes for contracts and as a result contracts are shabbily done and the tax payer is the looser in turn. State resources are treated like items to be wasted.

Ghanaians look for jobs at Customs because of the cuts they can make but not to help the nation collect levies. Most senior officers become wealthy not from their hard work or investments but from bribes and over- or under-invoicing. Maintenance of vehicles or properties is a windfall for the bosses. People buy spare parts and ask vendors to over-invoice the bill so that they can make something for themselves.

Ghanaians need to be honest with each other and this ought to commence at home. Kids need to be encouraged to tell the truth and not to lie for parents and so on. Honesty is a word that is lacking in the country and this is the reason why credit cards and checks are hard to find in the normalcy of business. Even business owners are not trusted to pay for bulk supplies made to them on credit. The market woman will buy and refuse to pay and there she can only buy her stock for cash which is limited to her. Small businesses fear mergers because some owners do not trust that their interest would be protected.

I do not know any other urban in Ghana apart from Accra and if I have to use what I say of the capital city in 1999 as a standard, I would say that the country is a filthy and unhealthy to live in. Plastic bags used for iced water is littered everywhere. Open and chocked gutters oozing stench is the order of the moment. The environment sucks indeed. I find no reason to risk my health in such a country. As for trash bumps, the least I talk about it the better it would be.

What has become of the education system is a mystery. Tax payers are wasting money producing nothing but educated illiterates. Many of the new College graduates from Ghana cannot express themselves intelligibly and are not even conversant in their own fields of study. A guy who read Administration with a bias in Accounting at the University of Ghana who I interviewed for a job could not even answer simple questions on costing which I quizzed him on. What do they read in the university? How can these guys help turn the country’s fortunes around. Public basic schools are nothing but a place where kids meet to play around because most of them study nothing there.

I got my basic and high school education in Ghana and can argue that Ghana’s educational system was among the best in the world. There is no wonder that the country has produced many people who have proved to be outstanding in their chosen fields. I do not need to give names at all to prove it.

The hospitals are becoming death shops. Patients are not given the right prescription because of poverty and the government cannot help because there too much on government’s plate. Doctors are leaving the country in droves because they are not well paid but the question is can the government afford it? The doctors were trained by the tax payer’s money but they turn their back on them. I think the country should produce a lot more of Physician Assistants and less doctors to help avert the tide.

People do politics everywhere and the rivalry is bitter everywhere as well, even here in the USA but the politics of some Ghanaians is simply outrageous. Consider the utterances of J. J. Rawlings on the serial killings. The guy has become a laughing stock for some of us here. You don’t do politics by telling outrageous lies with the hope that people would turn against your opponent. Rawlings needs to behave more like a matured human being. I believe that his low education level is a disadvantage to his politicking. Statements like what he made do not help win potential investors who are already reluctant to invest on a continent bedeviled with tribal wars, strange diseases, illiteracy and political instability.

Ghanaians have become hopeless and have even lost faith in their abilities. I am informed that a politician recently stated that only God can find solutions to the country’s problems. Such a politician does not fit to be re-elected into office because he has no clues to the problems of the country or his locality. We see this trend in every section of the society and the result is the proliferation of churches enriching the clergy.

To cut it short, the only way to solve Ghana’s problems is for Ghanaians to have a change in attitudes.
Odartey
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Why Ghanaians will always be poor

Postby KBro » Tue Jul 29, 2003 9:25 pm

Good stuff, nyemi. But there are some ignoramuses out there who wouldn't agree with although they cannot come out with constructive arguments. I mean it's so ridiculous for a whole staff of a national airline to invite a self-seeking crook who calls himself a pastor to pray so that the airline could be spared of bankrupt. An anago man would say Otioooo. Hope most Ghanaians will heed to your advice.
KBro
 

What are you doing?

Postby Yaansah » Fri Aug 01, 2003 4:54 pm

Dear Bro. Odartey,

You bring up some very valid points. But, I want to know what are you doing to improve the situation in Ghana? It is said that if you are not part of the solution, you must be part of the problem. Ghana needs the help of many people like you who are living abroad to make a sacrifice to support not just your own family but the country as a whole. I know more Ghanaians here in the U.S. that are professionals, such as doctors, lawyers, accountants, nurses, etc., than I do within my own race of people. Although, it may not be advisable for everyone to go back home to help the country, someone needs to go. Maybe its you? You seem to have the intelligence and knowledge that the country needs. It is not a hopeless case. As long as the Lord God is in heaven, there is never anything hopeless. A group of Ghanaians from all walks of life need to pull their resources and return home to begin to become a part of the political, social, and religious structures of the society. And yes, I know you are wondering how they are going to be supported, that is where trust must come in among Ghanaians, for no one is going to save Ghana but Ghanaians. Those that stay behind in countries abroad should help to support those that go back. There is a story in the Bible in the book of Nehemiah that tells how some Isrealites went back to build the wall of Jeruselum, while others stayed back to support them financially. That is what is needed today. Think about it! Who knows more about Ghana and its customs and cultures than other Ghanaians? You have a unique opportunity based on being exposed to other things to know how to incorporate new ideas into the society that can help bring about a monumental change that can only bring prosperity and a wholeness to the country. I challenge Ghanaians to quit complaining and see how you can become a part of something bigger than yourselves, something that is worth the well-being of your families and country, dear Ghana.
Yaansah
 

Postby Roy Jantuah » Wed Aug 06, 2003 4:02 am

Why Ghana will remain poor. What an interesting read. Odartey has touched on very interesting points and I would like to add that the events recently reported in the Independent about the coup plot in Ghana do not go down well with the type of investor we want to attract. Our people need jobs, our villages need developments, our economy needs to get better if want to be eventually get to where the developed world is.

Why would we not remain poor when supporters of J.J. Rawlings do not come to accept that JJ belongs to the past and the future needs new ideas? Africans are still living in the past and that is the reason for tribal wars, coups, ritual killings, chieftaincy disputes and so on. I cannot believe that with all the problems in other parts of Africa, a Ghanaian solider is even thinking about a coup. I have no doubt that Rawlings is remotely connected.

(P)NDC was in power for 20 years and what did they have to show with all the loans they got from international institutions. People talk about roads and electricity but which other government had the benefit of those years and size of loans. They should have done much better. How can we compare 20 years of (P)NDC with 20 months of NPP.

Yes there is not no hope in our future and that is the reason why Ghanaians risk their lives trying to head to Europe walking through the Sahara Desert just to lose their lives.
Roy Jantuah
 

Note

Postby Dasebre » Wed Aug 27, 2003 4:28 pm

Nabot wrote:I am often sad to read about how some Ghanaians feel about Ghana. The situations of Ghana is not hopeless as some have painted it to be. I was in Ghana a few weeks ago. I was not alone, I went with nine African Americans from United States. In spite of the distasteful bites they had from Ghana Airways and eventually had to fly out of Ghana by purchasing a tickt on Alitalia, they loved Ghana. Of the nine visitors, five would return next year to invest in various aspects of the economy: Housing, sewage, road construction, health care, etc.

The problem as I see in Ghana is one of policies and not lazziness on the part of Ghanaians. I will always maintain that Ghanaians are hard-working. I agree with the brother who touch on the issue of production due to the cheap labor in Ghana. During our visit, we visited a number of villages, among these villages is Pepetifi (Not Abetifi). I am sure you have not heard of that village, so is the Ghana Government, this village has vast fertile lands and food were going bad, although this village is just miles from Boti falls, it is a forgotten village, I wonder how many of such villages has been forgotten by the govenment although these areas could be the solution to our production problem.

It is difficult not to mention the waste that Ghana Airways Corporation is creating. It can not compete in a market where her competitors with less resources are doing better than her, yet, the govenment has cast a sleeping eye on her operations.

We mentioned the West and production, well at night when the western countries are working, Ghana is sound asleep creating a fertile environment for armed robbers. Let me explain: Most developed countries work their production sectors around the clock, three shifts, but Ghana work from 9AM to 5PM. What a waste of time and resources. Think about this, if Ghana is to work three shifts in her production sectors, our productivity would tripple by next year.

Someone spoke of Kalabule, I understand that word perfectly, the cause for bribery and curruption in Ghana is low wages, if one can not feed and maintain the family with what is honestly earned, then one is forced to resort to dishonest ways of living, everyone does it, the average traveller on Ghana Airways pays a bribe of at least $100.00 US to be confirmed from Ghana. If wages match spending, the issue of curruption will not be up for discussion.

Our Ghanaian education is one of the best in Africa and for that matter the world, when I transfered from my sixth form to a USA college, my class mates had nothing above me, I was a superior student. However, our educational system needs to be revamped, expecially, the so called, village schools. I agree with the contributor who questioned the ability of Ghanaian graduates, however, he has to realise that Ghanaians are intelligent.

As to the question of investing in Ghana, I will say, YES, Ghana is ripe for investment and investors, I have invested and it failed, but does that mean that investing in ghana is worthless, no, even businesses die everyday in America, in fact, the Small Business sector boast only of 20% survival in United states.

Regarding the confusion in Circle, Kaneshie, etc, please visit New York, Chicago, Atlanta, etc and tell me if Kaneshie-Odorkor traffic is not better. We continue to criticise, but I think it is time for each Ghanaian to ask the question, :WHAT CAN I DO TO HELP" Ghanaians are hard working, hospitable, and many more qualities that time would not allow to speak and write about, let us utilize these to the advantage of our country.

As far as government leadership is concern, I wish we have the option, "NONE OF THE ABOVE" since all our leaders failed us, including Kuffor and Rawllings; however, they did what they can do, it is up to you and I to do our part, one person at a time, one brick at a time to rebuild Ghana.


I hope readers of this thread will not the above quote.
Dasebre
 

Postby Pizier » Wed Aug 27, 2003 9:04 pm

I read the following on this website and I see the reason why Ghana will be continue to be poor.

http://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/N ... p?ID=41927
Pizier
 

Why Ghana will be poor

Postby Daniel Addo » Tue Sep 30, 2003 2:47 am

I am always saddened by what I hear about our beloved country. Sometimes little comments and condemnation here and there help us to at least see the true picture of our society. First of all, no single country is corrupt free not even in the developed world. I am not embracing the practice but it is human nature to be selfish and greedy which leads to corruption and other things. One of our serious problems is " check and balances" nobody is held accountable for his/her actions which is sad. One critical example of Odartey's article used Ghana airways. Well the airline is doomed to fail because it is for the Government and not for the CEO who when his wife travels gets vip treatment including how many tons of space for her personal belongings. It is sad and I wish the Government will realize this and privatize this failing industry where there can be a turn around. Ghana airways is always full from New York to Ghana but it is still running at a loss. Well accountability is the key here, someone is making a lot of money at the expense of the country and for that matter the tax payer. I am so appalled by the fact that whereever we go as Ghanaians we work harder than ever but at home our attitude towards work that makes us what we are is as I put it appalling. We all want Ghana to succeed but the very people including myself who want it to succeed are the very ones who want its downfall due to our actions. I am so baffled by what I see and hear every day about people wanting to invest in Ghana and coming back empty it is so sad.
I can only mention few things that we ought to do to make it work. All we need to do is acknowledge the fact that it will take education and sacrifices to make it work. Everything needs to be revamped people held accountable for their actions.
Daniel Addo
 

why Ghana will remain poor

Postby joe ewshi » Wed Oct 01, 2003 4:02 am

hi, I just read what you wrote about the woes of Ghana with some interest. Its true about all that you stated but however it would take a determined effort by all of of us to make such a change. It is however possible

Those of us who have had an opportunity to travel to experience other culture and lifestyle can do a lot to help. The major problem I see is the mobilisation of revenue as without addressing that issue it will be highly impossible to break out of this chain My humble suggestion is that there should be away to channel all our ideas to the government or better still a vigorous mobilisation of revenue from us Ghanaians living in the diaspora. Lets just say for instance. There is a way that we can contribute at least a dollar a month to support a cause at home. We will all suggest different causes and cast a vote on the net for a particular cause on the net. And make sure the adminstrators give us regular updates on it.

This is my suggestions I hope someone would also add up to it for its by this additions and subtractions of ideas that we can get something going.

We all pray for a better Ghana

Thanks

JOE ESHI
joe ewshi
 

why Ghana will remain poor

Postby joe eshi » Wed Oct 01, 2003 4:04 am

hi, I just read what you wrote about the woes of Ghana with some interest. Its true about all that you stated but however it would take a determined effort by all of of us to make such a change. It is however possible

Those of us who have had an opportunity to travel to experience other culture and lifestyle can do a lot to help. The major problem I see is the mobilisation of revenue as without addressing that issue it will be highly impossible to break out of this chain My humble suggestion is that there should be away to channel all our ideas to the government or better still a vigorous mobilisation of revenue from us Ghanaians living in the diaspora. Lets just say for instance. There is a way that we can contribute at least a dollar a month to support a cause at home. We will all suggest different causes and cast a vote on the net for a particular cause on the net. And make sure the adminstrators give us regular updates on it.

This is my suggestions I hope someone would also add up to it for its by this additions and subtractions of ideas that we can get something going.

We all pray for a better Ghana

Thanks

JOE ESHI
joe eshi
 

Re: why Ghana will remain poor

Postby Guest » Sat Oct 04, 2003 11:44 pm

joe eshi wrote:hi, I just read what you wrote about the woes of Ghana with some interest. Its true about all that you stated but however it would take a determined effort by all of of us to make such a change. It is however possible

Those of us who have had an opportunity to travel to experience other culture and lifestyle can do a lot to help. The major problem I see is the mobilisation of revenue as without addressing that issue it will be highly impossible to break out of this chain My humble suggestion is that there should be away to channel all our ideas to the government or better still a vigorous mobilisation of revenue from us Ghanaians living in the diaspora. Lets just say for instance. There is a way that we can contribute at least a dollar a month to support a cause at home. We will all suggest different causes and cast a vote on the net for a particular cause on the net. And make sure the adminstrators give us regular updates on it.

This is my suggestions I hope someone would also add up to it for its by this additions and subtractions of ideas that we can get something going.

We all pray for a better Ghana

Thanks

JOE ESHI


I would like to address some of the points Joe has made but before I tackle each one of them, I want to state that the problem bedeviling Ghana and indeed Africa has been created by Africans themselves. Corruption, lethargy and selfishness are the major architects of the malady.

According to Bank of Ghana reports, remittances from Ghanaians resident outside the country exceed $1 billions. We can deduce from this that Ghanaians living outside are already making contribution which could bolster the country’s balance of payments. I do not subscribe to the idea that we should contribute a dollar a month to help a cause in Ghana.

Ideas have been expounded over decades but nothing has come out of them. We hear of seminars, conferences, and you name it, but each of the meetings tend to be nothing but a talk shop.

Honestly, Ghana does not need loans or foreign aid. Africa has to stop begging for food aid to feed its people or financial aid to take care of its budget. Ghana has a lot of natural and human resources which should be harnessed for the development of the economy.

Ghana is not a cursed country or anything like that. Our problems are the result of our attitudes. Laziness, cheating, selfishness, corruption and lethargy are the pinnacle of our woes. Like Odartey wrote, Ghana will continue to be poor until we change our attitudes and realize that hard work is the only way to put Ghana in the light of development and prosperity.
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Postby inkumc » Wed Oct 15, 2003 3:22 pm

For those of you that missed the article by Dr. Edward Mahama. Find out by reading below notes.

Ghana Can Do A Lot For Its People – PNC
Posted: Oct 11 2003

The Leader of the People's National Convention (PNC), Dr. Edward Mahama, says Ghana is rich and can do a lot for the people if her resources are well managed. He mentioned education as an element to success and expressed the need for all children to be given the chance to have formal education.

Dr. Mahama said this on Friday when he opened a one-day seminar in Bolgatanga on Local Level Political Leadership and Democracy, organized by the PNC for its constituency chairpersons and organizers in the Upper East and Upper West Regions.

The PNC leader said there was no need for Ghana to remain poor and unable to educate all children to appreciable levels. Dr. Mahama urged the party leaders to make good use of the knowledge they were acquiring and manage their constituencies efficiently so that they could become independent of their regional offices.

Professor Kwesi Jonah of the Institute of Multi Party Democracy (IMD), which is sponsoring the seminar, announced that the IMD would soon be organizing a joint symposium for the PNC, the ruling National Patriotic Party (NPP), the National Democratic Congress (NDC) and the Convention People's Party (CPP)

He said even though the parties differ in ideology they should work in harmony with the common goal of promoting democracy and development. Professor Jonah commended the PNC for its initiative at improving the knowledge of its leadership and assured the party that the institute would continue to support it. - GNA
inkumc
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why not

Postby George Odoi » Mon Oct 27, 2003 1:11 am

Sure, until Africans in general change their attitudes, they will, like Ghana, remain poor. Read the following:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/africa/3211923.stm
George Odoi
 

Postby superman » Wed Oct 29, 2003 10:32 pm

Though true that Ghana will remain poor,if you keep on yapping about what you see as the problem,guess what,you are the problem.The fact is this,many of us overseas,are investing or have invested our entire competencies here and relegated Ghana to a non existentent background at the back of our minds.we like to go home to visit and spend money on trivialities so we can come back here to pay for it.The multi-dimensional nature of Ghana's economic woes is also compounded by forces beyond our control.We of ourselves cannot be of any benefit to our economy if we have no infrastruture or business plans or any initiatives set forth.
I think what we need to do is ,just do it.Dont waste everyone's time here on the web,just do it.Maybe,by some stroke of dumb luck ,you may be the spark we need!
superman
 

We will remain as poor as we are forever.

Postby Kofi Gyan » Thu Nov 06, 2003 3:15 pm

I do not understand why we do not adore success. I believe this "anti-success syndrone" (A-SS) was sown by the AFRC on June 4, 1979 and until we uproot all the weeds it (A-SS) has generated, we will continue to be backward, poor, uncivilized, and a scorn for the rest of the civilized world.

Consider the news about Banda as follows:

http://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/N ... p?ID=46179
Kofi Gyan
 

Talking about Attitudes

Postby George Odoi » Wed Nov 19, 2003 3:09 pm

I wrote about the attitudes of Ghanaians previously and still hold that opinion. The following is an article in the same light.
http://www.ghanaweb.com/GhanaHomePage/N ... p?ID=46641
George Odoi
 

Malthus

Postby Swiss Obroni » Fri Dec 05, 2003 1:17 pm

Remember the prophecy of British scientist Malthus? That world population will increase forever while resources will remain limited, leading to general starvation and poverty. The West could avoid that fate. But Ghana still has population growth at over 2%. Number of people is 17 million now. It was only 7 million few decades ago. Divide total income from natural resources like gold and cocoa by number of persons, and you will see why wealth has not increased. The only factor that has had a positive influence is the technology imported from the West.

All these unknown villages with their many small unhealthy children are pure sources of poverty. Their parents think that they are good for helping and working, but in fact they contribute to never ending misery.

Now the West is facing a threat towards economic prosperity due to the decreased percentage of working force compared to the retired ones. But
consider the consequences of 17 million old Ghanaians in 50 years!
Swiss Obroni
 

Re: Malthus

Postby Guest » Sat Dec 13, 2003 3:02 am

Swiss Obroni wrote:Remember the prophecy of British scientist Malthus? That world population will increase forever while resources will remain limited, leading to general starvation and poverty. The West could avoid that fate. But Ghana still has population growth at over 2%. Number of people is 17 million now. It was only 7 million few decades ago. Divide total income from natural resources like gold and cocoa by number of persons, and you will see why wealth has not increased. The only factor that has had a positive influence is the technology imported from the West.


Allow me to pluck a couple of holes in your script above.

The wealth of a country is not calculated by the average income from natural resources. If your claim were true then countries like Saudi Arabia and Qatar would be the richest countries in the world.

The source of income for a country is not from only natural resources. In fact data shows that countries that export natural resources (primary products) are worse off than those who process them for export. A very simple example is the export of cocoa from Ghana compared to cocoa products from the US to some other countries. Another example is uranium from Niger compared to enriched uranium from Russia.

With well over 1.3 billion citizens, China is the world's most populous country with a GDP of $4,400 per capita and real growth of 8% (2002 estimate). The GDP composition by sector is; agriculture: 15.2%, industry and construction: 51.2%, services: 33.6%. Compare this with Ghana, a population of 20 million with per capita of $2100 and real growth of 5.8% (2002 estimate). Ghana's GDP composition by sector is; agriculture: 36%, industry: 25%, services: 39%.

Question. Using the data on Ghana and China above, does the export of natural resources serve as the main source of wealth?
Guest
 

Growth for our beloved

Postby mamissah » Fri Jan 02, 2004 9:47 pm

OK okok. We have all bashed and smashed each other as well as the country itself. We have all also stated some really great facts and supported each other. The well educated amongst us have dazzled us with their eloquent word play as well as their ability to quote statistics and publications. In a way I think this is all part of our problem as well as the hidden solution we need.
It seems to me that we as Ghanaians revere the educated sometimes to a point where we do not challenge some of the decisions they make on our behalves. Instead we just cower and complain until we can take no more then we go and start coups. I am a Ghanaian American with a limited education (big up to my Rutgers university alumnae) and unfortunately like some people I tend to be self-centered. I think about myself and how to better myself and make a good living for myself etc. who does not think this way, of course we all do because as some of you have already said we are human.
The one thing though that I have come to love about this country is that any moron can start up a campaign and get enough money or people behind them and cause some change no matter how small a change. In my limited knowledge I think this is what we need in our beloved country, people who will challenge everything. This mode of thinking keeps people on their toes when they make decisions.
Being the type of person that I am I wish I could chair a committee of some sort or just be a member of a group appointed by the government. This group would be sort of a contract-based group responsible for going through each division of the government and straighten them out one by one. Without going on for too long what I mean is a group that is given the power to acquire analysts and professionals from the private section with no outside or prior influences to go through each branch access weaknesses and find ways to eliminate or redirect where necessary. I find that usually when bosses find out they could loose their jobs just as easily as those beneath them they tend to work their labor force to their full capacity.
My solution might sound a tad bit militaristic but I believe we need to purge our society of those who seek to make money for themselves by using our resources and giving nothing back.
mamissah
 

Growth for our beloved

Postby mamissah » Fri Jan 02, 2004 9:48 pm

Imagine hiring experienced as well as the best that our slightly lacking educational system has produced and giving them a voice. Their eligibility to continue in the committee also based on their performance so they do not get complacent. Every time a different branch is targeted for review a new sleuth of people are contracted to take on the task based on the expertise needed. One by one or sector by sector if we so chose to divide them up that way, we would go in with no fear for seniority but the willingness to do our job. We investigate productivity, costs etc. who needs to be cut who needs to be moved to different departments, which departments need to grow and which needs to just go.
Imagine our police force that just sits there drinking and collecting bribes everywhere they go and complain about low pay. I can’t help but laugh when I see New York cops getting killed all the time earning their money no matter how low it is. These policemen could be utilized to enforce so many of the laws that are being blatantly broken day by day. You might say they will just go and take more bribes but that is where my committee comes in, by hiring people with education and nothing to do to earn some money by going around the check points. These members tasks will involve taking notes on which officers are doing what and their jobs will mainly be to observe and report after which all those caught taking bribes would loose their jobs or in worse cases spend some jail time themselves.
Once again my ideas may sound a little crazy but it’s a simple fact that when you are unaware of who could be watching you when you are breaking the law you tend to do the right thing most of the time. Of course this will not happen out of the blue there will be briefings when all this is started to give every agency ample time to try and fix themselves and do what is right.
In my opinion there are too many people looking for jobs so those who have it should not be taking it for granted. If someone is found sleeping on the job of course they would not be fired (sacked as I remember saying in Ghana) but if the auditors note that this happens on a regular basis and even after warnings the individual continues on a destructive path the will be let go. There are people who are eager to be trained to do these jobs and when people find out they can easily lose their jobs to some young guy fresh out of college (I know older Ghanaians hate that) it will encourage them to take their jobs seriously.
I am not a big shot accountant that can crunch numbers like some of you, I am just an engineer, I see a problem I find a way to fix it and as an engineer I am also use to my work being double checked since things I design affect a lot of people. The same would apply to my committee; there will be someone or some group that checks our work from time to time. It could be someone or a board made up of some people already in office, we do not want to end up in a loop of having to hire more people all the time when our job is to make sure that productivity is increased.
mamissah
 

Re: Growth for our beloved

Postby Guest » Mon Jan 05, 2004 12:36 am

mamissah wrote:.................I am a Ghanaian American with a limited education (big up to my Rutgers university alumnae) and unfortunately like some people I tend to be self-centered. I think about myself and how to better myself and make a good living for myself etc. who does not think this way, of course we all do because as some of you have already said we are human...... Being the type of person that I am I wish I could chair a committee of some sort or just be a member of a group appointed by the government. .......



mamissah wrote:........Once again my ideas may sound a little crazy but it’s a simple fact that when you are unaware of who could be watching you when you are breaking the law you tend to do the right thing most of the time. .........In my opinion there are too many people looking for jobs so those who have it should not be taking it for granted. If someone is found sleeping on the job of course they would not be fired (sacked as I remember saying in Ghana) .........I am not a big shot accountant that can crunch numbers like some of you, I am just an engineer, I see a problem I find a way to fix it and as an engineer I am also use to my work being double checked since things I design affect a lot of people. The same would apply to my committee; there will be someone or some group that checks our work from time to time......



To be honest I do not make any sense out of the two essays you have written. All I can decipher is egotism.

What Ghanaians have to do to reverse the misfortunes of the country is what one of the contributors wrote in this forum and that is for Ghanaians to change their attitudes. The original writer of this forum made very important points and we can say for certain that unless Ghanaians mend their ways and think more about the impact of their actions on the future generations, Ghana will never be better.
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