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Napolitano to announce immigration policy changes

Postby Dr Vyrus » Fri Jun 15, 2012 2:25 pm

(CNN) – In an election-year policy change, the Obama administration announced Friday it will stop deporting young people who came to the United States as children of illegal immigrants if they meet certain requirements.

A release from the Department of Homeland Security is after the jump.

SECRETARY NAPOLITANO ANNOUNCES DEFERRED ACTION PROCESS FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WHO ARE LOW ENFORCEMENT PRIORITIES

WASHINGTON— Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano today announced that effective immediately, certain young people who were brought to the United States as young children, do not present a risk to national security or public safety, and meet several key criteria will be considered for relief from removal from the country or from entering into removal proceedings. Those who demonstrate that they meet the criteria will be eligible to receive deferred action for a period of two years, subject to renewal, and will be eligible to apply for work authorization.

“Our nation’s immigration laws must be enforced in a firm and sensible manner,” said Secretary Napolitano. “But they are not designed to be blindly enforced without consideration given to the individual circumstances of each case. Nor are they designed to remove productive young people to countries where they may not have lived or even speak the language. Discretion, which is used in so many other areas, is especially justified here.”

DHS continues to focus its enforcement resources on the removal of individuals who pose a national security or public safety risk, including immigrants convicted of crimes, violent criminals, felons, and repeat immigration law offenders. Today’s action further enhances the Department’s ability to focus on these priority removals.

Under this directive, individuals who demonstrate that they meet the following criteria will be eligible for an exercise of discretion, specifically deferred action, on a case-by-case basis:

1.) Came to the United States under the age of sixteen;

2.) Have continuously resided in the United States for a least five years preceding the date of this memorandum and are present in the United States on the date of this memorandum;

3.) Are currently in school, have graduated from high school, have obtained a general education development certificate, or are honorably discharged veterans of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States;

4.) Have not been convicted of a felony offense, a significant misdemeanor offense, multiple misdemeanor offenses, or otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety;

5.) Are not above the age of thirty.

Only those individuals who can prove through verifiable documentation that they meet these criteria will be eligible for deferred action. Individuals will not be eligible if they are not currently in the United States and cannot prove that they have been physically present in the United States for a period of not less than 5 years immediately preceding today’s date. Deferred action requests are decided on a case-by-case basis. DHS cannot provide any assurance that all such requests will be granted. The use of prosecutorial discretion confers no substantive right, immigration status, or pathway to citizenship. Only the Congress, acting through its legislative authority, can confer these rights.

While this guidance takes effect immediately, USCIS and ICE expect to begin implementation of the application processes within sixty days. In the meantime, individuals seeking more information on the new policy should visit USCIS’s website (at www.uscis.gov), ICE’s website (at www.ice.gov), or DHS’s website (at www.dhs.gov). Beginning Monday, individuals can also call USCIS’ hotline at 1-800-375-5283 or ICE’s hotline at 1-888-351-4024 during business hours with questions or to request more information on the forthcoming process.

For individuals who are in removal proceedings and have already been identified as meeting the eligibility criteria and have been offered an exercise of discretion as part of ICE’s ongoing case-by-case review, ICE will immediately begin to offer them deferred action for a period of two years, subject to renewal.
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Postby dr.luv » Fri Jun 15, 2012 10:43 pm

Great news! The Obama administration has announced that it will stop deporting DREAM Act-eligible youth. What’s more, it will use its administrative authority to grant,on a case-by-case basis, deferred action and work authorization to young people who are not in deportation proceedings and who meet the following criteria:

• Entered the United States before the age of 16 and have not yet turned 30.

• Have continuously lived in the United States for at least five years.

• Are currently in school, have graduated from high school or obtained a GED, or have been honorably discharged from the Coast Guard or U.S. Armed Forces.

• Have not been convicted of a felony offense, a significant misdemeanor offense, or multiple misdemeanor offenses.

Today’s announcement comes on the 30th anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Plyler v. Doe decision, which established that all children living in the U.S., no matter their immigration status, had the right to a public school K - 12 education. President Obama’s new policy affirms that right by recognizing that young people who’ve been educated here should also have the right to fully contribute to the welfare of their families and our society.
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Postby dr.luv » Sat Jun 16, 2012 3:53 am

According to the National Immigration Law Center,close to a million people in the U.S. will benefit from this new policy.

http://www.nilc.org/dreamrelief_061512.html
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Postby dr.luv » Mon Jun 18, 2012 11:44 pm

Law Grants Automatic Citizenship to Some Children Born Abroad

Most U.S. citizens acquire citizenship by being born in the U.S., or through a process called naturalization. However, there are certain people born abroad who can acquire citizenship automatically.

The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 grants automatic citizenship to the biological and adopted children of parents who are U.S. citizens.

How to Get Automatic Citizenship

The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 generally benefits children who were born outside the United States, are under 18 years of age and have at least one parent who is a U.S. citizen.

To qualify for automatic U.S. citizenship, a child must:

Meet the definition of “child” under immigration law. Be under 18 years of age. Have at least one parent who is a U.S. citizen by birth or through naturalization. Reside in the United States under the legaland physical custody of the parent who is a U.S. citizen. Be a lawful permanent resident.

If the child is legally adopted, he or she must meet all adoption requirements under immigrationlaw.

“Because citizenship law has changed over the years, if the person is now over 18 years of age, USCIS looks to the relevant law that was in effect before the child turned 18 to decide if the person acquired U.S. citizenship,” said Mariana Gitomer,an officer with the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

How to Prove You Are a Citizen

A qualified child does not need to file an application to establish U.S. citizenship, but the child will need a certificate of citizenship, which can be obtained by filing form N-600. This will ensure that all the requirements for citizenship have been met.

Once the form has been filed, an immigration officer will determine if an interview is necessary. If so, the applicant must meet with an officer and bring:

All original documents of the copies submitted when filing form N-600. Any additional documents that will establish if the child qualifies for citizenship. Certified translation of documents not originally in English.

How to Get More Information

These are the general requirements, but some unique situations may require additional steps. For more information contact the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 or visit www.uscis.gov.

June 18, 2012
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Postby Guest » Wed Aug 08, 2012 8:47 pm

Chicago News:

Join United African Organization along with ICIRR for the DREAM Act event held at Navy Pier on August 15th, 2012, which is the first day that DREAM eligible youth can apply for relief through deferred action!

Are you an undocumented young adult? You may qualify for deferred action and may be eligible to work legally in the United States!

To Qualify, you must:

1. Have been under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012; 2. Have come to the United States before reaching your 16th birthday; 3. Have continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time; 4. Have been physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012; 5. Have entered without inspection before June 15, 2012, or your lawful immigration status expired as of June 15, 2012; 6. Be currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED) certificate, or are an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States; and 7. Have not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor, three or more other misdemeanors.

Accepting Applications August 15, 2012 ***

Fee: $465 for Application and Work Authorization
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Postby Guest » Wed Aug 08, 2012 8:50 pm

Click here to Register!

About DREAM Relief Day Come to our workshop to find out if you qualify and get help with your application, and to visit with representatives from local colleges universities

Event Info: When: August 15, 2012 Time: 9am- 2pm Where: Navy Pier Grand Ball Room, 600 East Grand Ave. Chicago, IL

Prepare your documents and Educate yourself!

There are several documents you will need when you apply for the DREAM Act.
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Postby dr.luv » Tue Aug 21, 2012 1:29 pm

Were You Brought Into the United States as a Child? Find Out if You are Eligible for Deferred Action...Last week, the Department of Homeland Security began accepting requests for "deferred action" status from people who were brought into the United States as children. Deferred action status would allow these people to remain in the United States and make them eligible to receive a work permit.

http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis/ ... 2ca60aRCRD
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