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nigeria scores again: Moderators allow, please

Discuss investment opportunies in Ghana and other financial issues

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nigeria scores again: Moderators allow, please

Postby Post » Wed Sep 16, 2009 1:38 am

This will help you in the long run!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

http://ca.tech.yahoo.com/blogs/the_gadg ... ticle/3874


Buying and selling throughout the world on eBay or through local classifieds on Craigslist is a great way to make some extra money or find what you're looking for at a good price. But fraudulent activity is a regular thing on these sites, which is why you need to protect yourself.
Scams and spam via email has been around for quite some time. Whether it's cheap Rolex watches or some Nigerian prince offering up millions, you've likely seen emails that are obviously not what they initially appear to be.

Some cyber attackers will send you emails that appear to be official ones from eBay, usually indicating that the site needs you to confirm your information or to update records. This method of attack is called "phishing", which means that the attacker is hoping you will click the link and log in with your username and password to "phish" for your info. The problem is that you won't be logging into eBay, but rather a fake site that records your username and password, so they can access your account and possibly even steal your identity.

The warning signs of these emails are numerous. Bad spelling and grammar is a big one, but so is the generic salutation. Official eBay emails will always address you by your full name, not "Dear Member" or "Dear eBay user". Check the email address it came from. If it's a series of strange numbers or letters, then it's a fake for sure. Also, eBay doesn't require you to update anything on your profile.

You may also receive a random eBay email that seems to be from a buyer or seller asking for either a product or payment that hasn't been received yet. Needless to say, if you haven't bought or sold anything on the site for a while, you should know it's a fake. Every item posted on eBay has an ID called an "item number". These spoof emails don't have those items numbers. And if they do, and you're not sure, copy and paste that item number into an eBay search and see what comes up. Usually, the search will yield nothing.

It's unlikely that you would receive these types of emails from Craigslist, since that site doesn't function in quite the same way. Still, when posting something for sale, you may end up getting a response from a prospective buyer who is willing to pay more than your asking price. This "buyer" likely also has a shipping address in the U.S. or another country. Trust me, it's too good to be true. The scammer will claim to have sent payment via PayPal or some other online payment system and expect you to send the item thereafter. Usually, they will also ask that you send it to a "daughter studying overseas" or "my mother who I'll be visiting soon" - definitely a warning sign. In some cases, he or she will claim that it takes a few days for payment to clear, which is simply not true. You could end up losing out on both the money and the item, if you're not careful.

Another key thing to keep in mind here is that you should never click a link that comes in these eBay or Craigslist scam emails. Always visit either site by typing in the Web address yourself.

You should also do this if you have a PayPal account as well. One particular scam to look out for is those who send money using a credit card, and then contacting the site for a chargeback after receiving the item. The site's seller protections for this aren't great at all, so be sure that the address you're sending to is "confirmed". Some peace of mind you might be able to gain is by linking a chequing account to your PayPal one, and then transferring the funds after a transaction to ensure that they don't take them out.

There are plenty of resources you can check out to see if you've run into an attempted scam. These include a general listing and description of the various scams, information on what protections are in place for buyers on eBay and the key signs of fraud on PayPal
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Postby el Padrino » Wed Sep 16, 2009 1:44 am

Ghana's right behind them too. Abeg remove the log in ur eye first.
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Postby Post » Wed Sep 16, 2009 2:08 am

el Padrino wrote:Ghana's right behind them too. Abeg remove the log in ur eye first.


I wrote this?
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Postby Doctor No » Wed Sep 16, 2009 3:24 am

el Padrino wrote:Ghana's right behind them too. Abeg remove the log in ur eye first.

Please tell the yeye man. :oops:
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Postby bigpokey69 » Wed Sep 16, 2009 6:36 am

el Padrino wrote:Ghana's right behind them too. Abeg remove the log in ur eye first.
:lol: :lol: :lol: ether, the midget post has been found out
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Postby 419ner » Wed Sep 16, 2009 4:26 pm

Chei, Nigeria we Fail Thee! Upon all Akunyili’s rebranding? :lol:
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